I been working with Jason Little (@jasonlittle) on delivering Vision Collaboration Workshops for my company, PointClickCare. By ‘working with’ I mean he’s been doing all the presenting and I get to stand around, watch him and chip in my 2 cents whenever necessary.  I will be conducting this workshop on my own in the coming months and leaning on Jason’s experience to get me through them.

One of the great games that he has introduced me to is a communications game that highlights the benefits of doing things the agile way.

You break the group into two teams, “Product” and “Developers”.  Have the Developers leave the room while you give the instructions to the Product team.  The Product team is given a picture:

Agile

 

and 5 minutes to write a specification document describing how to draw this.  The Developers come back in and read the spec and draw what they have read.  They are not allowed to ask the Product any questions other than handwriting clarifications.

You get some very interesting diagrams:

Agile drawing

Agile Drawing 2

Bull Symbol Agile Drawing

The instructions said “draw the bull symbol from the stock exchange”, so I can see how this happened.

Ask the Product people if they would accept this version and the vast majority reject.  There are some exceptions, this drawing, for example was fantastic:

2016-08-17 16.01.52

The next round has a different drawing and a different set of rules.  This time, in 5 minutes, you have the Product and Developers sit together and the Product describes what they want while watching the Developers draw.  The only rules are they can not show the Developers the picture and they can not use their hands.

After the 5 minutes you get a very different result. Nearly everyone experiences a sharp increase in acceptability, a better drawing that closely matches what they were working from.

I’ve used this as a team building exercise for a couple teams outside of agile and had great success with it. When using it for communication techniques, I had the teams sit back to back for the first round instead of writing out the requirements. The second round I had them facing each other. It really highlights the benefit of proper communication.

Difficulty: Easy